A Classic, Revisited


I had bought an Alsatian free-range chicken Saturday, which I turned into a lemon chicken a la ‚Arthur’s Tochter‘, a blogger I like to follow. She says she first became aware of the recipe in a book bei Alfred Biolek, one of Germany’s cooking show pioneers, but says it could have originated with Marcella Hazan. The discussion is pointless, since the process of stuffing juicy lemons into a chicken cavity is not so out-of-this-world as not to have been thought up by regular folks preparing something with a twist. The question is merely who first recorded the recipe.
Anyway, even this text is pointless, because as I readied my camera, it first whirred, then whined and then died. No picture.
This Sunday night dinner is an attempt to salvage what was left of the weekend’s delicious foods.I had a pound each of white and green asparagus.
Peel the white and cut off 1/2 an inch of the ends. The green only need it’s last third peeled. I then cut the stalks into thirds and put them in a pot with 1 inch water, salt, sugar and lemon juice. Bring to a boil and cook the asparagus until tender with a little bite.

1/2 pound of mushrooms (Champignons)
2 shallots
butter
1 leftover breast of chicken in different sized pieces.
leftover chicken gravy .25l
cream

Basmati rice
cook the rice in the usual way (2x water, 1x rice, salt simmer 20 minutes)

for the gravy dice the shallots, fry in butter, deglaze the pan with Noilly Prat, add the leftover chicken stock and cream. I used about 100 ml of cream of 32%. After that I added the mushrooms and the chicken pieces/shreds to warm them.

To put the dish together, I made a ring of rice (I own a wooden shaper). I added the separately cooked asparagus, then topped it with the chicken mushroom gravy mixture. To thicken the sauce a little bit, I used a teaspoon of cornstarch mixed with a little cold water.
This was quite good, with the base of course being the chicken stock. I had cooked chicken stock from scratch a few weeks ago and had portioned it in freezebags. I used the last of these bags today. To make the stock from scratch is completely worth it, I can only recommend it.

The quantities described here would have fed four, but we are two. So I get it tomorrow as lunch-pretty fancy!

 

Beef tenderloin as a salad!


Every once in a while we get this hankering (hankering? Yes, hankering!) for raw or rare beef.
In this instance I had bought a beautiful piece of beef tenderloin weighing about 8 ounces or 240 grams.

All I did to it was to salt it with fleur de sel, pepper it, fry it quickly from all sides, and slice it as thinly as I could. The meat was draped over a bed of rocket salad, topped with fried brown mushrooms, and finished with a light vinaigrette.
Oh, I forgot one thing: Those little yellow slices are very hot german pepperoni and pack about as much heat as a fresh Serrano chili.
Hallelujah!