Seabream/Dorade


All these years I didn’t know my favorite mediterranean fish (albeit full of fishbones) is called seabream in English.

In German it is Dorade, Goldbrasse or Meerbrasse. I suppose the Brasse and the bream have some etymological connection, as close as the two languages are.

This is not a language site, however, so on to the business at hand.

Its Friday, we’re in a predominately catholic area (just barely), so fish is the food of choice on a Friday. All of this is really maxnix to me, I eat fish because I love fish, and especially this seabream.

The method of preparation is very simple.

The fish I gutted (the fishmonger neglected to offer this service and I didn’t notice, it was my first time in a fish shop across the street) and washed under clear water. The cavity was stuffed with fresh basil, the skin I serrated with 4 cuts on each side, rubbing the cuts with salt, thyme, rosemary and sage. The sage was fresh, the thyme not, I’m afraid.

I pre-cooked the potatoes until they were just done and set them aside.

The tomatoes were fresh and cut into quarters. They joined sautéed onion and garlic along with (canned) artichoke hearts- you never would have been able to tell. This mixture got liberal quantities of olive oil, parsley and basil.

All this was sautéed in a pan on the stove with a good measure of olive oilDorade-Tomaten-Artischocken-Kartoffeln-2-(2). The oven was pre-warmed to 180 C. Once the vegetables started to come together, I placed the fish over the veggies and roasted everything for 25 minutes.

That bream was bony, but so delicious! The vegetables were just what I like. Very seaside!

Superlatives aside-people who don’t like to deal with fishbones (and I know a few) should order something else, they’ll never be happy with this selection.

Dorade-Tomaten-Artischocken-Kartoffeln-2-(1)

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